This Week in Animal Protection

News and headlines for November 6 - 20, 2021

  
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In “Death by a Thousand Cuts,” we discuss how compromises in the pursuit of money lead to corruption and how organizations that start out with great promise and make a fortune challenging the status quo, then become the status quo at the expense of their values, their mission, and the very animals they promised to protect. 

Oreo, an abused dog, was killed by the ASPCA, despite a rescue group offering to save her. Two volunteers of the group even went to the ASPCA but were escorted out after the ASPCA refused to meet with them. On a cold, Friday morning, 12 years ago this week, Oreo was killed; not by her abuser, but by those whose mission it was to protect her. 

As we solemnly observed the 12-year anniversary of the ASPCA’s killing of Oreo, an abused dog, who a No Kill sanctuary offered to save, new legislation aims to stop this from ever happening again. A new study finds that even quieter sounds, like the low-battery “chirping” of a smoke detector, could trigger fear and anxiety in dogs and the anxiety could be just as intense as thunder or fireworks. A first hand look inside the PETA kill room. A Federal Court of Appeal has ruled that an officer who unreasonably shoots a dog can be held civilly liable for violating the constitutional rights of the dog’s family. Why do animal shelters kill? Impossible foods, a company saving nearly 250,000 animals a year, wants to save even more with the launch of its Impossible meatballs. When “community sheltering” means no sheltering. The number of communities placing over 95% is increasing. And “Death by a Thousand Cuts,” an eye-opening discussion as to how humane organizations become corrupted in their pursuit of money, friendships, and power.

These are some of the stories making headlines in animal protection:

As more people turn to rescue and adoption and more shelters embrace progressive policies, the number of communities placing over 95% and as high as 99% of the animals is increasing. 

These shelters and the data nationally prove that animals are not dying in pounds because there are too many, because there are too few homes, or because people don’t want the animals. They are dying because people in those pounds are killing them. Replace those people, implement the No Kill Equation, and we can be a No Kill nation today.

And, finally, how do organizations go from championing lifesaving to defending those who kill animals? From building parvo puppy wards and bottle baby programs to calling for fewer kennels, the cutting of shelter budgets, and closing the doors to needy animals? From hosting conference workshops on how to wage a campaign for No Kill reform to featuring directors who not only kill animals, but allow them to suffer horrifically? And from fighting regressive directors on behalf of shelter reformers to fighting shelter reformers to protect even abusive shelter directors?

In an eye-opening podcast, we discuss how compromises in the pursuit of money lead to corruption and how organizations — like Austin Pets Alive and Best Friends — started out with great promise and made a fortune challenging the status quo, but then became the status quo at the expense of their values, their mission, and the very animals they promised to protect. 

(Two short audio clips are of Lester Bangs as portrayed in the 2000 film Almost Famous.)